God dammit.

(Source: sandandglass, via thesailortitan)

femalevillain:

they just went and got a bunch of stuff for the protesters using the donations so far so keep donating if you can!!

(Source: wolfcola, via thesailortitan)

ucresearch:

How militarized are your police?
This map by the NY Times gives a break down of how much our country’s police forces have become stocked with military surplus weapons and gear.  The trend started in the 1990s from a program designed to deal with extra equipment during the winding down of our wars.
This has no doubt added to the tensions with situations in Ferguson, MO. The St. Louis region has had many issues with racial profiling in the past. In fact, UCLA’s Center for Policing Equity is actually in the middle of a study in St. Louis to explore this very issue.  
These researchers have studied departments all over the country. Recently in Las Vegas they found the lack of diversity training in their police department was causing officers to exhibit racial bias when using force on an individual. In their survey asking officers to anonymously talk about how they view diversity training one said:

All diversity training basically states that if you are white you are wrong, and that everyone else’s culture takes precedence over society’s established norms.

So what can these researchers recommend? and how much sway do their recommendations have?  In the Las Vegas case they recommended the police department integrate diversity training with its training on use-of-force situations.  They also said an outside group should be monitoring incidents where officers stop pedestrians.  
While this type of research may inform policy/policymakers, it also affects citizens at the ballot box. John Gaskin from the Missouri NAACP discussed the historic lack of voter turnout among African-American Ferguson, MO residents:

We warned people about these kinds of things.  Who hires the police officers? The police chief. Who hires the police chief? The mayor. Who hires the mayor? Who elects the council folks?

You can read more about UCLA’s Center for Policing Equity here and about the debate to demilitarize the police here.

The map shows that most of the military hardware — guns, night vision equipment, and vehicles — is in counties along the border.

ucresearch:

How militarized are your police?


This map by the NY Times gives a break down of how much our country’s police forces have become stocked with military surplus weapons and gear.  The trend started in the 1990s from a program designed to deal with extra equipment during the winding down of our wars.

This has no doubt added to the tensions with situations in Ferguson, MO. The St. Louis region has had many issues with racial profiling in the past. In fact, UCLA’s Center for Policing Equity is actually in the middle of a study in St. Louis to explore this very issue.  

These researchers have studied departments all over the country. Recently in Las Vegas they found the lack of diversity training in their police department was causing officers to exhibit racial bias when using force on an individual. In their survey asking officers to anonymously talk about how they view diversity training one said:

All diversity training basically states that if you are white you are wrong, and that everyone else’s culture takes precedence over society’s established norms.

So what can these researchers recommend? and how much sway do their recommendations have?  In the Las Vegas case they recommended the police department integrate diversity training with its training on use-of-force situations.  They also said an outside group should be monitoring incidents where officers stop pedestrians.  

While this type of research may inform policy/policymakers, it also affects citizens at the ballot box. John Gaskin from the Missouri NAACP discussed the historic lack of voter turnout among African-American Ferguson, MO residents:

We warned people about these kinds of things.  Who hires the police officers? The police chief. Who hires the police chief? The mayor. Who hires the mayor? Who elects the council folks?

You can read more about UCLA’s Center for Policing Equity here and about the debate to demilitarize the police here.

The map shows that most of the military hardware — guns, night vision equipment, and vehicles — is in counties along the border.

WATCH THE ROAD

WATCH THE ROAD

(Source: twitterscreencaps, via dutchster)

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

fishyschuylkill:

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

Ellestanger posted about reporting this page

http://Facebook.com/cheatandgetbeat

in support of the guy who assaulted christy mack and also just assaulting women in general and I did report it and… That’s what fb replied.

posting about one assaulted woman for every clicked like is TOTALLY acceptable

What happens if thousands of people report it? Can we try? If you have a fb will you report it?

Having trouble reporting the page. The normal place to report things is missing. What do?

If you’re on safari on iPhone it won’t show up, only shows up thru the ap. If you’re on a computer idk why that would be.

It was in the ••• thing o the right of “message.” I took a while to find it, because the instructions on the help page directed me to a little gear symbol in the upper right-hand corner that wasn’t there.

so-humorous:

Awkward Food Dancing Fall
More Hilarious Fall Fails Here

If that’s how you want to interpret it, fine.
But what the artist said about her piece was that it was about getting back up after a fall, not just the falling. It’s about always being able to rise after a fall, no matter how many times she falls. 
In this piece, she falls many times. She rises each time.
Just so you’re aware of who’s going on here.

so-humorous:

Awkward Food Dancing Fall

More Hilarious Fall Fails Here

If that’s how you want to interpret it, fine.

But what the artist said about her piece was that it was about getting back up after a fall, not just the falling. It’s about always being able to rise after a fall, no matter how many times she falls. 

In this piece, she falls many times. She rises each time.

Just so you’re aware of who’s going on here.

(via dutchster)

martininamerica:

thechanelmuse:

thechanelmuse:

thechanelmuse:

BREAKING: Black Man Shot and Killed by Police in South L.A.

A 24-year-old man has died after being shot by police during an encounter in the Florence neighborhood of South Los Angeles, officials said Tuesday.

The incident began at 8:12 p.m. when officers responded to a report of a shooting at the intersection of West 65th Street and South Broadway, said Lt. Ellis Imaizumi of the Los Angeles Police Department.

Eight minutes later, at 8:20 p.m., the officers stopped a man who was walking in the 200 block of 65th, authorities said.

“A struggle ensued” and police opened fire, according to a statement from the Police Department.

The man was transported to a hospital where he underwent surgery, according to Officer Sara Faden, spokeswoman for the LAPD. He later succumbed to his injuries. No officers were hurt in the incident.

It is unknown if the suspect has any gang affiliations, police said.

A woman who said she was the deceased man’s mother identified him as Ezell Ford.

Tritobia Ford said her son was lying on the ground and complying with the officers’ commands when he was shot.

Yet another one…It’s always a “struggle.” And why bring it up if it’s unknown. They know exactly what they’re insinuating. Be fearful of black people and not the police… This is insanity. 

EZELL FORD WAS UNARMED. This happened just two days after Mike Brown’s murder. (8/11)

UPDATE: It has been reported that Ezell Ford was mentally disabled.

image

An eyewitness to the killing, Leroy Hill, describes what happened: “He wasn’t a gang banger at all. I was sitting across the street when it happened. So as he was walking down the street, the police approached him, whatever was said I couldn’t hear it, but the cops jumped out of the car and rushed him over here into this corner. They had him in the corner and were beating him, busted him up, for what reason I don’t know but he didn’t do nothing. The next thing I know I hear a ‘pow!’ while he’s on the ground. They got the knee on him. And then I hear another ‘pow!’ No hesitation. And then I hear another ‘pow!’ Three times.”

At one point while the police had Ford on the ground, but before the shooting took place, Hill said, he heard an officer yell, “Shoot him.”

Unrest has rocked the suburb in the days following Brown’s death. At least four people, including two police officers, have been hurt and 47 arrested in the aftermath of the shooting.

image

On Wednesday morning in South LA, a group of about 10 young and middle-aged men gathered at a makeshift sidewalk memorial lined with candles and signs that read “Police brutality must stop.”

The men at the memorial near the sight of the shooting were visibly shaken by the events that had unfolded there Monday night. They expressed anger toward the LAPD. They said that Ford wasn’t a gang member at all — that he was a “good guy,” a local man who was born and raised in the neighborhood, one whom everyone knew and liked, who routinely played basketball and who also suffered from some form of mental illness.

While all of the men said Ford suffered from some mental illness, they couldn’t confirm what it was. One young neighbor, who requested to not be identified, said that while “he wasn’t all there, he was there enough to follow orders and know to stop when the police tell him to stop. He did nothing wrong.”

Another eyewitness told KTLA that Ford’s mental state was well-known in the neighborhood and to the police.

"They laid him out and for whatever reason, they shot him in the back, knowing mentally, he has complications. Every officer in this area, from the Newton Division, knows that — that this child has mental problems," the man said in an interview with the local network. "The excessive force … there was no purpose for it. The multiple shootings in the back while he’s laying down? No. Then when the mom comes, they don’t try to console her … they pull the billy clubs out." The young neighbor described the incident as "racial bullshit."

image

Source

jesus christ

When the last resort is used first,

When police lose sight of the law,

the law is lost. Chaos reigns before strongmen impose their order,

And we are no longer free.

(via feministbecky)

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

Ellestanger posted about reporting this page

http://Facebook.com/cheatandgetbeat

in support of the guy who assaulted christy mack and also just assaulting women in general and I did report it and… That’s what fb replied.

posting about one assaulted woman for every clicked like is TOTALLY acceptable

What happens if thousands of people report it? Can we try? If you have a fb will you report it?

Having trouble reporting the page. The normal place to report things is missing. What do?

(via fauxcyborg)

Tags: facebook

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!
One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

Does music help? I like to think music would help, but maybe it’s just wishful thinking.

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!

One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

Does music help? I like to think music would help, but maybe it’s just wishful thinking.

(via sanityscraps)

Tags: panic attack

skrelp:

A police officer shot and killed an unarmed, mentally challenged black man in Los Angeles on Monday, his family said.

Family members identified Ezell Ford, 25, as the man the cop killed on the 200 block of West 65th St. about 8:20 p.m. And one eyewitness says the officer yelled “shoot him” before killing the man in the street.

His mother, Tritobia Ford, said the shooting was unjustified and that her son was complying with the officer’s orders, according to local media.

"My heart is so heavy," she told KTLA. ”My son was a good kid. He didn’t deserve to die the way he did.”

Ford, she said, was lying on the ground when the officer shot him in the back three times.

A man claiming to be Ford’s cousin told the station he witnessed the incident and that there was no justification for excessive force.

"They laid him out and for whatever reason, they shot him in the back, knowing, mentally, he has complications. Every officer in this area, from the Newton Division, knows that — that this child has mental problems," he told KTLA.

And another eyewitness told the Huffington Post that an officer screamed out “shoot him” before the unarmed Ford was filled with three slugs.

Source

Do these police officers care about what’s happening in Ferguson? Do they think everyone’s distracted?

(via feminist-fairy)